Bodyweight circuit training is a great method to use when a few of you are together or of if you train groups in a single session. This type of training comes with some fantastic benefits. This is a fantastic low impact alternative to running long distances. But there’s even better news.

THEY PROVIDE A SUPERB RECOVERY WORKOUT AFTER AN INTENSE DAY OF EXERCISE THE DAY BEFORE!



THEY ALSO HELP ATHLETES FOCUS MENTALLY ON A CERTAIN TECHNIQUE WHEN THEY ARE TIRING!

What you should remember here is that these bodyweight circuits can be carried out over a certain time period. This will be around 30 to 50 seconds depending on the level of athlete. You could also set the training up over a prescribed number of reps. The important thing is to keep the interest so interchanging the exercises will keep everyone entirely focussed.

Ensure you’ve worked all of this out beforehand and know which exercise goes with the selected time or reps!

As the circuits are used as a recovery and aerobic capacity workout the athletes should never at any time stop and rest fully. There’s a simple way of doing this:

    ENSURE THE ATHLETES JOG AT AROUND 50 PER CENT INTENSITY FOR 30 METRES BETWEEN EACH EXERCISE!

You can alternate things to suit the people involved but a 10 exercise circuit is generally a good workout. You can even go through this 2 or 3 times – this is great training for athletes of all levels. But make sure they rest for at least four minutes between sets!


A Look at the Competing Athletes!

Speed and power athletes like jumpers, sprinters and throwers may do circuit training three times each fortnight. This is fine for them because they are not running for long distances and so won’t need the volume. Endurance athletes are usually quite resistant to working out in the weights room and tend to enjoy this sort of circuit training more!

Back to the Circuits!

These exercises should be able to work the entire body so nothing is left out – the trick is to balance out the level of exercise involving each part of the body so you avoid overload! This type of training can be used all year round both indoors and outdoors. They serve as great preparation training for events as well.

A Piece of Advice?

Younger athletes should go last. They might not like it too much at first but this can help them focus when they are tired. Technique, a strong finish and the will to win is often forged within the individual by doing this. So many events can be won at the last second or with the last jump or throw! It won’t be lost on them for sure.

In part 2 we’ll be looking at the exercises themselves and how they should be carried out – then you’ll have a complete set to hand ready to organise your athletes or group. Always refer back however the notes in part 1!

Michael Donelly

About Michael Donelly

Michael Donelly is Gnet's founder and occasionally posts information. If you'd like to get in touch about anything business related you can contact him on Twitter: @MichaelDonelly2. And if you like what you read here then why not sign up for our newsletter to get regular updates on your interests?

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